LIGO’s latest cosmic spinning of space weather phenomena

The fact that ligonauts are screwing around without any concerted scientific view is clearly revealed by the diverse statements by expert LIGO scientists that run the gamut “if it stands up” to “we’re very confident.” From a false alarm rate of “1 in ten septillion years” to “identification isn’t entirely certain”. They are all over the place, all confidently. When that happens on a single discovery issue, … well, you make your own conclusions.

This is the LIGO Cover-up Plan unfolding. They are trying to save faces and cover butts by concocting more and more fantastic “discoveries.”

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This latest signal, however, was very loud. It was observed by both LIGO detectors and the Virgo detector, with a total false alarm rate estimated to be 1 in ten septillion years. A septillion is a one with 24 zeros after it.
Scientists would have to wait for a quadrillion (1,000,000,000,000,000) times longer than the age of the Universe to get an event like this by accident from noise alone.
Based on preliminary publicly available results, this event (named S190814bv) appears to be the first Neutron Star — Black Hole merger candidate.
– 21 August 2019

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“This is a huge milestone—if it stands up,” says Patrick Brady, spokesperson for the more than 1300 scientists working with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)
… That lack of an optical counterpart means the identification of the objects rests entirely on their masses, which researchers estimate from the gravitational waves. One is heavier than five solar masses, and the other—the presumed neutron star—is lighter than three, Brady says. But that second identification isn’t entirely certain, Kalogera says. “Maybe it’s not a neutron star? Maybe it’s a tiny black hole?” In fact, based on the earlier observation of merging neutron stars, some theorists argue a neutron star cannot weigh more than about 2.2 solar masses.
-18 August 2019

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“We’re very confident that we’ve just detected a black hole gobbling up a neutron star,” says Susan Scott, a theoretical physicist at the Australian National University in Canberra and a chief investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery. -21 August 2019

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“It is clear that this is a real gravitational wave signal, produced by the merger of two compact objects [neutron stars or black holes]. But whether the second object object (in the binary) is a neutron star or black hole can be established only at the end of a careful analysis, which is currently ongoing,” says P. Ajith, astrophysicist from International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Bengaluru, and a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration. – 21 August 2019

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